Editorial Review Group Chairs: Benjamin A. Willenbring, MD, and Sheffey N. Massey, III, DO
Editorial Review Group Chair
No Comments on Editorial Review Group Chairs: Benjamin A. Willenbring, MD, and Sheffey N. Massey, III, DO 26

Drs. Benjamin Willenbring and Sheffey Massey have been Editorial Review Group Co-Chairs for Emergency Medicine since October 2018. Over the past three years, we have sent them 89 books and they and their groups of reviewers have reviewed 64. 

Dr. Willenbring attended medical school at Drexel University, received his residency training at Hahnemann University Hospital, and his fellowship in Medical Toxicology at Regions Hospital. He is board certified in emergency medicine and medical toxicology. He is a member of the American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP), the American Association of Emergency Medicine (AAEM), the American College of Medical Toxicologists (ACMT), and the American Academy of Clinical Toxicology (AACT). Dr. Willenbring says: “I chose to become a physician and specialize in emergency medicine and medical toxicology because I wanted to be in a position to provide immediate help to the people who need it most. I enjoy working with patients and sharing with them the level of information they want and need. I try to involve my patients in the decision-making process as much as possible.” 

Dr. Massey attended medical school at Des Moines University Osteopathic Medical Center. He completed his internship at Henry Ford Bi-County Hospital and his residency in emergency medicine at McLaren Oakland Hospital. Dr. Massey is a retired Lieutenant Colonel from the Air National Guard with 30 years of service. He is a member of the American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP) and the American Osteopathic Association (AOA). Dr. Massey says: “I chose emergency medicine because of the fast pace, patient variety, and broad knowledge base needed for this field. For many years, I was an EMT/paramedic, and as I brought patients to the emergency department, I always wanted to participate in their care after the street. One of the most important things I do is help patients and their families feel comfortable in the ED setting. This can be a very scary place, and if the staff members can lessen anxiety, the experience can be much better.” 

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Leave a comment

Back to Top